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Sunday, 19 October 2014

Fabric design process




During the last weekend, when I took over the AGF instagram account, I was talking a bit about my design process, so I thought to post a few pics about that, here too.


I start by hand drawing, sketching and painting, surrounding me with inspiration and depending on the theme, it can be "real life" or some historical pictures from books and/or internet.



Very often, I use my own photographs, processing them in Photoshop, developing new images, placing them in repeats.

But, mostly I scan my original art and I make patterns with them, always in Photoshop (I don't like to use vector images), as it's giving me the possibility to work in layers, with lots of textures, preserving the "organic look" of the shapes.



After obtaining the final image, and making the repeating tile (or block) out of it, I start developing the color palettes.


I often use some pictures of nature to create the appropriate palettes and mood boards.


Of course, I make about 3 times more prints in order to obtain a good 10 prints, indispensable for one collection.

This is pretty much how I work to develop my collections.
If you have any questions, I would love to hear in the comments ;)

xo, Katarina


2 comments :

Louise Allen said...

You have a beautiful blog, its a pleasure to read and your artwork i amazing!!

Katarina said...

Thank you so much Louise for the comment :)