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Sunday, 18 October 2020

Moresco table runner


I always wanted to make one simple table runner for my table and finally I did it! I used one of my first quilt patterns that was featuring my very first fabric collection, Indelible and adapted it a bit to make this very easy to make table runner.

You can see the original pattern HERE.

And here are the measurements/requirements for this table runner:

Finished size: 27.5 x 54.5 “ (70 x 138 cm)

Block size: 14 x 14”

Total blocks per table runner: 8 (4 blocks A and 4 blocks B)

Seam allowance: ¼”

Based on the 42” wide fabric.

 

The whole quilt is constructed with 2 ½ strips. Each block is composed of 7 rows. 

There are 4 blocks in one orientation (blocks A) and 4 blocks in mirror-image orientation (blocks B)

 

Fabric A: PIC-39454 Painted Field Tangerine                                       1/6 yd

Fabric B: PIC-39457 Botanical Study Soft                                            1/6 yd

Fabric C: PIC-29458 Mystical Quest by Night                                     1/6 yd

Fabric D: PIC-29457 Botanical Study Dark                                          1/6 yd

Fabric E: PIC-29454 Painted Field Cerise                                             1/6 yd

Fabric F: PIC-29451 Arts & Crafts Rose                                               1/8 yd

Fabric G: PIC-39456 Bound Treasures Blush                                        1/8 yd

Fabric H: PIC-39455 Ornatile Vert                                                         1/6 yd

Fabric I: PIC-39458 Mystical Quest by Day                                          1/8 yd

Fabric J: PIC-39451 Arts & Crafts Cloud                                              1/8 yd

Fabric K: PE-433 Snow                                                                          5/8 yd             

Fabric L: PE-413 Caviar     or   PIC-29456                                            1/3 yd

 

 

Binding fabric: 1/2  yds (suggested)

Backing fabric: 1 3/4  yds (suggested)

 

 

Cutting directions:

¼ seam allowances are included

 

eight (88.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric A

eight (8) 8.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric B   

eight (8) 8.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric C   

eight (8) 8.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric D   

eight (8) 6.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric E   

eight (8) 4.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric F   

eight (8) 2.5” x 2.5” squares from Fabric G   

eight (8) 6.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric H   

eight (8) 4.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric I    

eight (8) 2.5” x 2.5” squares from Fabric J    

eight (8) 2.5” x 2.5”  squares from Fabric K

eight (8) 4.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric K

hundred (32) 6.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric K

eight (8) 2.5” x 2.5”  squares from Fabric L

eight (8) 4.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric L

eight (8) 6.5” x 2.5” rectangles from Fabric L


                                                BLOCK A   and   BLOCK B



And here's the assembled table runner:



If there will be some interest, I will probably write the PDF pattern soon, but hopefully this can help enough for anyone willing to create it ;)



Enjoy,
Katarina

Wednesday, 14 October 2020

Dunes quilt block - pillow tutorial


Last year, I was asked to create something simple and fun for the Simple sewing magazine, featuring my color master designer box collection. So I designed this easy block constructed with 3" HSTs and turned it into a pillow, actually I made two;)

I was brainstorming ideas for the pillows for my just released Picturesque collection and as HTS are always a good idea for the pillow covers, I used the same block! I also got some HST left overs, so I created another composition, but I will show them both in my next blog post, just wanted to have the original version saved here, before ;)


So here it goes:


Decorative pillow covers are the easiest and fastest way to change the home décor, without major investment. Bold and funky patterns can sometimes be too much or too busy if used in bigger home décor projects, but can be awesome if used for smaller scales projects, like pillows, to embellish and add a touch of color and pattern in your home space. Additionally, quilting adds a bit of texture and stabilize the sewing/piecing, while trimming around the edges, adds a modern look.


To get the printable template, download it HERE

 

The featured fabrics: “Paprounes Crimson”, “Uninhibited Fashion”, “Steps Above Prism”, “Greeka Fouxia” and  “Morse Dot Sun” from the “Designer’s palette, edition #1” by Katarina Roccella for Art Gallery Fabrics.

 

Materials

For 1 pillow, finished size 15 x 15”

 

-Fabrics:

Fabric A:  Paprounes Crimson, Fat eight

Fabric B:  Uninhibited Fashion, Fat quarter

Fabric C:  Steps Above Prism, 5/8 yard

Fabric D:  Greeka Fouxia, Fat eight

Fabric E:  Morse Dot Sun, Fat eight

Decorative trim (pom-pom or similar): 2 yds

-Medium weight, one-sided fusible interfacing or batting - 16 x 16” piece 

-Pompom or other decoratiove trim, 65” long (2 yds)

-16x16” or 15x15” pillow insert

-Cutting mat and rotary cuter* optional

-Ruler  

-Scissors

-Iron

-Needle and thread

-Sewing machine

-Pins

-Fabric pencil or marker

 

 

CUTTING:

¼ seam allowances are included

 

Two (2) 4“ x 4” squares from Fabric A

Ten (10) 4“ x 4” squares from Fabric B

Two (2) 17“ x 22” rectangles from Fabric B (for pillow back)

Ten (10) 4“ x 4” squares from Fabric C

Eight (8) 4“ x 4” squares from Fabric D

Six (6) 4“ x 4” squares from Fabric E

 

 

Pillow front

 

To make the pillow front, there are total of 36 HSTs (half-square triangles).

Guided by the cutting and fabric requirements, make the following HSTs:

 

A+B    make 4

B+C    make 16

E+D    make 12

D+C    make 4

 


HSTs construction:

 

Place and align two 4” x 4” squares in corresponding prints, right sides together and with a marker or pencil draw a diagonal line across the wrong side of the fabric. Sew a 1/4" seam on both sides of the drawn line. Cut the squares on the drawn line. In this way, you will obtain two HST’s. Press seams either open or to one side, upon your preferences. Pressing the seams open eliminates bulk and makes it easier to match the seams. Trim HSTs to 3 x 3”.

 

Following the quilt block diagram, compose the quilt block: start by joining the HST units (as shown in diagram) in order to obtain the horizontal rows. Sew all right sides together with ¼ seam allowance. Press the seams. Join the composed horizontal rows to complete the block. Press the seams. Fuse the interfacing on the wrong side of the block /pillow front or pin the piece of batting and quilt it. If needed, trim and square the pillow front. 

 

Adding the trim

 

With right side of the pillow front up, start pinning the trim all way around, starting from one corner and rounding it slightly on all corners. Sew the trimming in place, with the smallest seam allowance possible, finishing where you started, overlapping the trim’s edges.

 

Note: there are different weights, qualities and sizes of the trims, and depending on that, you may be able or not to slightly round the corners for the nice and professional finish. Thinner and softer trimmings are more suitable for shaping, while with thicker trimmings, you may be forced to cut the trimming separately for each of the pillow’s edges and overlap the edges on all corners. 

 

Pillow back

 

The easiest way to make the pillow back is with simple envelope back. 

Take the rectangles cut for the pillow back, fold and press them on the longer side (22”) in half, wrong sides inside, so that you obtain two 17 x 11” pieces. 

 

Pillow assemble

 

 

Overlap the back pieces, squaring them and place the pillow front with right side inside-facing the overlapped backs. Pin all layers together and cut the backs leftover edges to the size of the pillow front- 15.5 x 15.5”. Sew around all edges with ¼ seam allowance, rounding the corners slightly, to prevent protruding. Turn the pillow case right side out and place the pillow insert inside.




xx

Katarina

Tuesday, 14 April 2020

Fabric face mask tutorial


Hi!
It's been a while...and maybe I wouldn't even pop up, if it wasn't for this new Pandemic situation that, unfortunately we are all living at the moment.



About a month ago, I started making fabric masks, as a necessity, because we couldn't buy them in the pharmacies - they were sold out and of course, the medical facilities needed them more then ever.
I saw on the internet, especially Instagram, that in many countries that were firstly "attacked" with this nasty virus, people started making different kinds of fabric masks, so I started testing and trying different kinds of patterns.

The one that I liked the most, was kindly sent to me from a fabric friend on Instagram - Nida and here, I am bringing the pattern that I slightly changed (mainly regarding the filter placement opening).
I really like the fact that it sits on the face nicely, and the nose part is nicely covered, without use of additional wire, but it can eventually also be added.

There are also  many tutorials providing different kinds of elastic or tie options, and I suppose that it can depend on the personal preferences, availability or maybe even some strict rules, that certain facilities have set as parameter or best solution.

Art Gallery fabrics collected and shared many useful and helpful info regarding some fabric facts and also different pattern options on their newly created webpage, so I suggest that you look at it.

Here's the printable fitted face mask PDF pattern. You can find the IGTv video HERE


In case that you don't have the printer at home, I am attaching here also the original pattern I got from Nida, that is very easy to be drafted, following the measurements she provided.


My youngest daughter Bianka (modelling her homemade masks), helped me a lot in making and sewing masks and also created the video for how to make it (by herself!), and you may find it on my Instagram and as my first ever IGTV.

Happy sewing!
Katarina